Province of St. Albert the Great, USA

Know Before You Go

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Fr. Brian Walker, OP breaks open the readings for the Fourth Sunday of Easter, Good Shepherd Sunday, reminding us that as Christians, we are all called to shepherd one another. Sometimes that can be unpleasant, or dirty, or smelly, but is is also rewarding and where we find our salvation.

Readings: Acts 4:8-12, 1 John 3:1-2, John 10:11-18

John 10:11-18

Jesus said: ‘I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. The hired hand, who is not the shepherd and does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and runs away—and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. The hired hand runs away because a hired hand does not care for the sheep. I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, just as the Father knows me and I know the Father. And I lay down my life for the sheep. I have other sheep that do not belong to this fold. I must bring them also, and they will listen to my voice. So there will be one flock, one shepherd. For this reason the Father loves me, because I lay down my life in order to take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it up again. I have received this command from my Father.’

(New Revised Standard Version Bible: Anglicized Edition, copyright © 1989, 1995 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide. http://nrsvbibles.org)

Know Before You Go is a ministry of the provincial office to help people prepare to hear the readings and preaching of the approaching Sunday's Mass. You can sign up and receive an email each morning with the latest Word of Hope.

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